Archive for the ‘1997’ Category

Happy Holidays

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Wed Dec 24 09:43:07 1997
>Comments: Authenticated sender is
>From: “James H. E. Maugham”
>Organization: J.H.E. Maugham & Associates, Inc.
>To: WORLDCRUISING@LISTSERV.INFOHOUSE.COM, AV8RLINK@VM.STLAWU.EDU,
> mahan@microworks.net
>Date: Wed, 24 Dec 1997 11:45:16 -0500
>Subject: Happy Holidays
>Priority: normal
>X-mailer: Pegasus Mail for Win32 (v2.53/R1)
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>(View in Terminal or other non-proportional font for best results!)
>
>SEASONS GREETINGS _…._
> \ _ / .::o:::::.
> (\o/) .:::””:o:.
> — / \ — :o:_ _:::
> >*()<_>> >0> >>>@> >@>*<0>> >*>>@> >@>>0> >*>>0> >@>>**> \*/ >0>>*0>> __\\U//___ >*>>@><0>>@>> \\ | | \\| >@>>0>@> \\| | _(UU)_ >((*))_>0>> \ \| || / //||.*.*.*.|>>@><0 _==|
> \\_|_|&&_// ||*.*.*.*|_\\db//__ (\_/)-|/^\=^=^^=^=/^\| _=_|
> “””|’.’.’.|~~|.*.*.*| ____|_ =(‘Y’)=//,————.
> |’.’.’.| ^^^^^^|____|>>>>>>| ( ~~~ )/(((((((())))))))
> ~~~~~~~~ ‘””””`——‘ `w—w` `————‘
>
>May you all obtain your heart’s desire for the Holidays.
>
>Warm regards,
>
>James

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Book

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Tue Dec 23 21:19:14 1997
>X-Sender: tcrobi@pop.mindspring.com
>Date: Tue, 23 Dec 1997 23:19:28 -0500
>To: mahan@microwrks.com
>From: Tom Robison
>Subject: Book
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>I saw a book at the book store tonight, about the naval careers of many
>well-known actors. I thought I would remember the name of the book, and the
>authors, but of course it has left me.
>
>Anyway, if you’re interested, look for a blue dust jacket with small photos
>of many actors all around the perimiter.
>
>Merry Christmas, all.
>Tom
>
>
>Tom Robison
>Ossian, Indiana
>tcrobi@mindspring.com

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Baseball

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Tue Dec 23 19:08:26 1997
>X-Errors-To:
>Date: Tue, 23 Dec 1997 21:06:09 -0500 (EST)
>X-Sender: rickt@pop3.cris.com
>X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 1.4.4
>To: mahan@microworks.net
>From: rickt@cris.com (Eric Bergerud)
>Subject: Re: Baseball
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
> >With apologies to non-baseball fans (and off topic).
> >
> >Steve Alvin quoted:
> >
> >”I have snatched my share of joys from the grudging hand of fate
> >as I have jogged along, but never has life held for me anything
> >quite so entrancing as baseball.”–Clarence Darrow
> >
> >Let me add another VERY meaningful quote/appriasal:
> >
> >”…Baseball is the greatest game ever invented.”–Frank Layton,
> >former head coach of the National Basketball Association’s Utah
> >Jazz in an interview on KTAR, Phoenix, AZ.
> >
>All American owe baseball and football an immense debt of gratitude. Without
>these noble sports, soccer might be popular on our country. If the American
>people begin to appreciate a game that is played for 90 minutes and OFTEN
>results in a scoreless tie, it is time to close shop. At least yacht racing
>has winners.
>Eric Bergerud, 531 Kains Ave, Albany CA 94706, 510-525-0930

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Destroying the Königsberg, 1914-15

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Mon Dec 22 10:43:48 1997
>Date: Mon, 22 Dec 1997 09:41:25 -0800
>From: Mike Potter
>Organization: Artecon, Inc.
>X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.01Gold (WinNT; I)
>To: patience@batelco.com.bh
>Cc: mahan@microworks.net
>Subject: Re: Destroying the Königsberg, 1914-15
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>Merry Christmas Kevin,
>
>Citing your excellent =Königsberg: A German East African Raider= as my
>primary source, I recently contributed a short account of the Königsberg
>operation to Mahan.lst, an Internet discussion list about naval history
>and events. Here is one of several replies.
>
> From your book, it seems clear that the spotters used wireless
>telegraphy as Dr Francis suggests. Have you any information about the
>electronics on the aircraft?
>
> > Does anyone have any more details on exactly how the British seaplanes
> > “spotted” for the Royal Navy? The Farman and the Caudron were early
> > planes, had they been fitted with streaming aerials or something? Did
> > they use wireless, perhaps some sort of morse code? I’ve always been
> > under the impression that aerial spotting doesn’t become reliable until
> > the 1920s.
> >
> > Timothy L. Francis
> > Historian
> > Naval Historical Center
> > email address: Francis.Timothy@nhc.navy.mil
> > voice: (202) 433-6802

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Königsberg communications

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Mon Dec 22 13:53:39 1997
>Date: Mon, 22 Dec 1997 12:48:36 -0800
>From: Mike Potter
>Organization: Artecon, Inc.
>X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.01Gold (WinNT; I)
>To: mahan@microworks.net
>Subject: Königsberg communications
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>Kevin Patience’s answer to Timothy Francis’s question:
> >
> > Merry xmas Mike,
> > Amazing how time flies, another year gone.
> > I sent a note to Tim Francis and confirmed that morse code was used by
> > key and trailing aerial using a clock code with north at 12 oclock.
> > Anything else on KBG?
> > rgds Kevin

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My Fair and Positive Reception on H-Holocaust

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Sun Dec 21 17:09:19 1997
>X-Authentication-Warning: ecom5.ecn.bgu.edu: mslrc owned process doing -bs
>Date: Sun, 21 Dec 1997 18:08:23 -0600 (CST)
>From: “Louis R. Coatney”
>X-Sender: mslrc@ecom5.ecn.bgu.edu
>To: Mahan@microwrks.com, H-Russia@h-net.msu.edu, H-Holocaust@h-net.msu.edu
>cc: “Louis R. Coatney”
>Subject: My Fair and Positive Reception on H-Holocaust
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>The past week or so, I have been given the chance on H-Holocaust to voice
> my opinion about the need for Nazi Holocaust investigators (and survivors)
> to share whatever they can to help researchers and victims of Soviet
> atrocities in their own struggle for historical truth and justice.
>
>I’m no expert on the Nazi Holocaust and some of my questions have touched
> some of the deepest sensitivities of H-Holocaust members … some of
> whom are Survivors … but however impassioned, the responses have been
> basically fair, thoughtful, and reasoned.
>
>I feel much better about the prospects for historical truth and justice
> … for the better future *everyone* is striving for … now. Maybe
> there is hope for humanity after all.
>
>For sure people can do much more working together instead of working
> against each other.
>
>Lou Coatney, mslrc@uxa.ecn.bgu.edu

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OFF-TOPIC: Double Dialing Speed of Modems

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Sat Dec 20 23:21:14 1997
>From: EWitten507
>Date: Sun, 21 Dec 1997 01:16:26 EST
>To: WWII-L@LISTSERV.ACSU.BUFFALO.EDU, WWI-L@RAVEN.CC.UKANS.EDU,
> MILHST-L@UKANS.EDU, mahan@microwrks.com, MARHST-L@POST.QUEENSU.CA,
> sub-list@webcom.com
>Subject: OFF-TOPIC: Double Dialing Speed of Modems
>Organization: AOL (http://www.aol.com)
>X-Mailer: Inet_Mail_Out (IMOv11)
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>I know this is off-topic, but for those of us who use modems as
>our means of connection to the Internet, the following suggestion
>concerning modem initialization strings has proved useful to me.
>
>If you have a touch tone phone, you can put the S11=50 parameter in your
>modem initialization string to double the speed of dialing. Try and see if
>it works on your phone system. For example, my modem initialization
>string before I added the S11 parameter read AT&F&C1&D2X4. After I
>added the S11 parameter, it read AT&F&C1&D2X4 S11=50. I hope that
>someone else can benefit from this tip like I have.
>
>Happy holidays!!!
>
>Edward Wittenberg
>ewitten507@aol.com

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Re[2]: Letow Schnapps

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Thu Dec 18 21:34:30 1997
>X-Errors-To:
>Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 23:33:44 -0500 (EST)
>X-Sender: rickt@pop3.cris.com
>X-Mailer: Windows Eudora Version 1.4.4
>To: mahan@microworks.net
>From: rickt@cris.com (Eric Bergerud)
>Subject: Re: Re[2]: Letow Schnapps
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
> > I suspect they were “good capitalists” with their license revenues
> > waiting for them after the war. So that they had funds on hand to get
> > back to work with after the inevitable departure of the Austrian
> > Corporal.
> >
> > One clarification: Cinchona may be/have been raised in Indonesia, but
> > its original source is South America.
> >
> > I have heard of this Japanese controlled source problem before. But
> > what about the original source? Did they, maybe, use Atabrine just
> > ’cause it was cheaper? Or maybe the South American supply is/was not
> > adequate to satisfy the demand?
> >
> > Bill Riddle
> >
>You’re right of course. Quinine is arguably the oldest significant medicinal
>herb that actually works and dates from the early Spanish Empire. The
>appropriate volume in the series of the Army’s medical history details the
>development of atabrine industry by US. They cited lack of supply – it may
>well be that it had become a plantation crop by the 20th Century and
>something that you cannot create quickly. The sheer numbers of tablets were
>staggering. Several vets told me that quinine (some was around early in the
>war) had uncomfortable side effects – especially a ringing in the ears. BTW:
>atabrine’s side effects were NOT well known at the time it was being “field
>tested” on US and allied troops (medical supplies were high on the Lend
>Lease priority list). Rumors concerning sterility and it’s known tendency to
>yellow the skin caused customer resistence at first. Officers were ordered
>to force men to take it at mess. The reality of malaria attacks overcame
>this barrier and the stuff was accepted readily soon enough. Guess no harm
>was done. Either that or post WWII lawyers had not yet honed their art to
>today’s degree.
>Eric Bergerud, 531 Kains Ave, Albany CA 94706, 510-525-0930

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“Smokey” Stover

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Thu Dec 18 22:54:55 1997
>Date: Fri, 19 Dec 1997 00:53:04 -0500
>From: Brooks A Rowlett
>Organization: None whatsoever
>X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.01-C-MACOS8 (Macintosh; I; PPC)
>To: Andrew Toppan ,
> Mahan Naval History Mailing List ,
> World War II Discussion List
>Subject: “Smokey” Stover
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>On one of the mailing lists I am on there was a mention, in a thread on
>nicknames in maritime services, of a comic strip with a character called
>”Smokey” Stover.This prompted me to generate the following:
>
>The name “Smokey” Stover is of some minor note in USN and cinema
>history. In 1943 a documentary was made about brand new ESSEX class
>carrier, CV-10 USS YORKTOWN. Lt Elisha Terril Stover acquired the
>nickname “Smokey” probably from the source cited. He flew Wildcats off
>USS HORNET at Midway, and wound up on Guadalcanal after HORNET (CV-8)
>was sunk at Santa Cruz Oct 42. After interesting experiences on the
>’canal, Stover returned home to become the naval aviator assigned to
>the new Combat Information Center (CIC) on the new carrier YORKTOWN.
>He is seen and introduced in this role in the film THE FIGHTING LADY
>(not to be confused with the Korean War MEN OF THE FIGHTING LADY which
>seems to be a rip-off of BRIDGES OF TOKO-RI). He had begged all along
>to be returned to the iar, and was eventually re-assigned to Fighting 5
>(VF-5) the Hellcat squadron in YORKTOWN’s air wing. A very popular
>officer, he was forced to bail out of his plane during the big strike
>on Truk, Feb 44. He was reported as missing in action, but was believed
>to have drifted ashore at this major Japanese base.
>
>Squadronmate Dick Newhafer composed a final tribute that evening:
>The call came
> On metal-fashioned wings
>And echoed til it spent;
> He bade farewell
>To all the well-loved things
> And then he went.
>A fresh wind
> Bore him away tonight,
>The world is sad,
> He gave his mirth
>For all the world’s delight,
> T’was all he had
>
>Not great, but as good a farewell as any.
>
>Postwar it was learned that of 7 downed US aviators who came ashore,
>all were beaten and tortured by their captors. Then , the day after the
>raids ceased, all were marched to the beach and beheaded with swords.
>
>The above is from THE FIGHTING LADY (book) by Clark G Reynolds. A
>wartime biography of this Junior USN naval was published, called THE
>STORY OF SMOKEY STOVER. Just another casualty in some ways, but not a
>faceless or nameless one thanks to his friends and the whims of fate and
>documentaries.
>
>-Brooks A Rowlett

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African Queen

Friday, January 2nd, 2009
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From Wed Dec 17 23:01:14 1997
>Date: Thu, 18 Dec 1997 00:05:39 -0800
>From: TMOliver
>Organization: Kestrel/SWRC/Oliver
>X-Mailer: Mozilla 3.01 (Win16; I)
>To: mahan@microworks.net
>Subject: Re: African Queen
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>John Forester wove a web:
>
>(snipped, an anecdote almost as attention-maintaining as the
>magnificently simple tales his father told)
>
>I remember first reading (actually, trying to read) the three in one
>Captain Hornblower at about age six, and in the years of my childhood I
>continued to devour every available bit and weeviled-biscuit of CSF. I
>recall the deep disgust with which I exited my first viewing of the
>movie Hornblower. How could CSF have allowed such a travesty? How
>could Gregory Peck, the ideal selection for the part, assist in its
>perpetration? That was before I understood that authors had little say
>in screen adaptations and story lines.
>
>And now, fortunate association with this list has once more brought the
>author to life in the vivid anecdotes of his son. CSF lives in them,
>and his ships, great and small, are recommisioned by them. I sleep
>again in Hornblower’s cabin, and clear is the sound of the officer of
>the watch’s heels on the deck above.
>
>Thank you, John Forester, for sharing with us both the pleasure and a
>bit of the pain of having known him. May his tales live on to keep
>other little boys’ bedsight lights on late for years to come.
>–
>”A little learning is a dangerous thing,
> But more is inevitably catastrophic!”
>

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Purpose
The Mahan Naval Discussion List hosted here at NavalStrategy.org is to foster discussion and debate on the relevance of Admiral Alfred Thayer Mahan's ideas on the importance of sea power influenced navies around the world.
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