The Reluctant Seaman

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From Mon Dec 29 07:25:36 1997
>From: “Francis.Timothy”
>To: mahan@microwrks.com, “‘mahan@microworks.net‘”
>Subject: RE: The Reluctant Seaman
>Date: Mon, 29 Dec 1997 09:23:01 -0500
>X-Mailer: Internet Mail Service (5.0.1457.3)
>Precendence: bulk
>Sender: mahan-owner@microworks.net
>Reply-To: mahan@microworks.net
>
>For anyone who wants an intelligent and nuanced view of Mahan and his
>writings I heartedly suggest Jon Tetsuro Sumida’s *Inventing Grand
>Strategy and Teaching Command: The Classic Works of Alfred Thayer Mahan
>Reconsidered* (Washington, DC: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 1997).
>You can get it for $20 at 202-287-3000, ext.218.
>
>To give you an idea of the book, the preface title is *Musical
>Performance, Zen Enlightenment, and Naval Command.*
>
>Just a teaser. Read *The Influence of Seapower upon History, 1660-1783*
>with the idea that it is NOT about the rise of the Royal Navy. It will
>open your eyes to an entirely new interpretation of the book and Mahan.
>And, the best thing you can do is to ignore Chapter one.
>
>Timothy L. Francis
>Historian
>Naval Historical Center
>email address: Francis.Timothy@nhc.navy.mil
>voice: (202) 433-6802
>
> > ———-
> > From: Tom Robison[SMTP:tcrobi@mindspring.com]
> > Reply To: mahan@microworks.net
> > Sent: Saturday, December 27, 1997 2:15 AM
> > To: mahan@microwrks.com
> > Subject: The Reluctant Seaman
> >
> > “Although a brilliant naval historian and noted theorist on the
> > importance
> > of sea power to national defense, Alfred Thayer Mahan hated the sea
> > and
> > dreaded his duties as a ship’s captain.”
> >
> > That’s the lead-in to an article on the HistoryNet Page about our
> > namesake
> > A.T. Mahan. Read the full text at:
> >
> > http://www.thehistorynet.com/AmericanHistory/articles/1997/0297_text.h
> > tm
> >
> >
> > Tom Robison
> > Ossian, Indiana
> > tcrobi@mindspring.com
> >
> >
> >
> >

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The Mahan Naval Discussion List hosted here at NavalStrategy.org is to foster discussion and debate on the relevance of Admiral Alfred Thayer Mahan's ideas on the importance of sea power influenced navies around the world.
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